Classical music – Ziad Rahbani http://ziad-rahbani.com/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 03:54:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ziad-rahbani.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Classical music – Ziad Rahbani http://ziad-rahbani.com/ 32 32 Handel’s “Messiah” Today: How Classical Music Compares With … https://ziad-rahbani.com/handels-messiah-today-how-classical-music-compares-with/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 18:24:54 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/handels-messiah-today-how-classical-music-compares-with/ (MENAFN – The conversation) No work of Western classical music is more closely associated with the Christmas season than German-born composer George Frideric Handel’s Messiah, premiered in 1742. In recent years, audiences have been able to choose between performances modeled on those of the composer’s era, performances following the 19th century tradition of massive choirs […]]]>

(MENAFN – The conversation)

No work of Western classical music is more closely associated with the Christmas season than German-born composer George Frideric Handel’s Messiah, premiered in 1742.

In recent years, audiences have been able to choose between performances modeled on those of the composer’s era, performances following the 19th century tradition of massive choirs and modern instruments, and even staged and choreographed interpretations of the work. When COVID-19 reduced live performance, online video presentations became a new medium.

This was following global protests over the murder of George Floyd and a global revitalization of Black Lives Matter. Among artists from different industries, black classical artists like baritone Andrew Adridge, in conversation with writer Michael Zarathus-Cook, called for classical music to solve systemic problems. He noted, “There is a problem with race in… arts organizations because there is a problem in Canada” and “avoiding conversations” will not help.

In a separate article, Zarathus-Cook wrote of how “we need to recognize that the protests we have seen are being spurred both by the urgent need for a radical assessment of the police force and of how they interact with [Black, Indigenous and people of colour], and the more subtle, culturally diffused everyday racism that is not triggered by a prematurely triggered trigger, but by words and social cues that remind racialized people in this country that they are irrevocably looking from the outside. “

Even before the global Black Lives Matter protests, a 2018 report prepared for the nonprofit Orchestras Canada by writer and arts consultant Soraya Peerbaye and violinist and ethnomusicologist Parmela Attariwala documents “systemic inequity and coloniality in Canadian orchestras ”, ranging from orchestral leadership and governance structures to their repertoire and working methods. Music scholars also grappled with the colonial legacy of classical music, including Handel’s investments in the slave trade.

Two interpretations of “Messiah”

In December 2020, Against the Grain Theater (AtG) in Toronto and Soundstreams produced pre-recorded films based on Handel’s Messiah which were released for free on YouTube. Both organizations have shown creative ingenuity to pivot quickly into the pandemic to produce digital content and provide jobs for artists in the early months of COVID-19 as the precariousness of artists’ livelihoods grew increasingly Claire.

The way these two Canadian companies have chosen to respond to our contemporary context of anti-racist appeals during the performance of the Messiah provides an opportunity to have a conversation about how performers and audiences of Western classical music can s ” engage more fully in anti-colonial and anti-racist work.

To these questions we, two academic white settlers, bring our combined expertise in research into 18th century music and how independent opera companies in Canada are helping works of the past address contemporary issues. One of us (Nina) is involved in a project, “Exploring New Collaborative Models in Indigenous-led Opera in Canada. This collaboration is with Amplified Opera, a Toronto-based collective that inspires audiences to “embrace diverse and stimulating cultural experiences.”

Against the ‘Messiah / Complex’ of the Grain

Against the Grain Theater’s new interpretation of the Messiah, Messiah / Complex, hoped to support Indigenous and under-represented voices as part of their mandate to present familiar plays “in innovative ways and in unusual places.” They decided to present Handel’s orchestral music as originally written, which was to be performed by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, but they hired all the native, black or racialized solo singers, 12 in total.

Joel Ivany, Founder and Artistic Director of AtG, partnered with Reneltta Arluk, Director of Akpik Theater and Indigenous Arts at the Banff Center for Arts and Creativity to co-lead the production. Ivany said artists are encouraged to choose the setting and language of interpretation for their performances. The film features segments in Arabic, Dene, English, Inuktitut, Inuttitut, French and Southern Tutchone.

Articles from the New York Times, the BBC (endorsed by Margaret Atwood) and other major media have garnered more than 138,000 views in 44 countries. Arts journalist Brad Wheeler, writing in The Globe and Mail, described it as an “impressive lesson in reconciliation and inclusion”, while a New York Times headline on the history of the writer Dan Bilefsky declared that Handel’s work was “free from the bonds of history.”

Soundstreams’ “Electric Messiah”

Another production based on Handel’s work, Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah has been billed as “a complete music video that reinvents Handel’s classic for today’s world” and “brings the past to life in a new way that reflects the city we live in “.

In keeping with Soundstreams’ mandate to showcase the work of living composers, the company has made minimal changes to the lyrics. Instead, the artists combine these lyrics with new music with influences from electronic dance music, pop and hip hop.

Electric Messiah was also well received, but reached a smaller and mostly local audience.

The colonial legacy of classical music

In the Peerbaye and Attariwala Orchestras Canada report, they call on Canadian orchestras “to create non-hierarchical environments in which artistic inquiries of Indigenous artists and artists of color can take place.” Engaging in “broader conversations about the experiences of Indigenous peoples, people of color and other equity-seeking communities” will enable orchestras to “cultivate equal and reciprocal relationships that meaningfully support artistic research. current ”.

These recommendations are echoed in Hungry Listening: Resonant Theory for Indigenous Sound Studies, a recent book by Stó: lō researcher and artist Dylan Robinson. He notes that the problem with the inclusion of more diverse artists and traditions, without changing existing working methods, is that even the “best integration intentions continue to strengthen and maintain the hierarchical dominance of artistic music by as a genre to which other music must conform. “

Fair collaborations with musicians from other traditions will involve working in new ways. Robinson also recommends highlighting the irreconcilability of different musical traditions. Allowing these differences to be heard could promote greater openness to the idea that reconciliation cannot be achieved through the “inclusion” of Aboriginal people in existing colonial models.

New interpretive frameworks

In Messiah / Complex, some artists expressed the Indigenous resurgence by singing in Indigenous languages ​​or challenging classical and Western colonial tropes. Baritone Nêhiyaw-Michif (Cris-Métis) Jonathon Adams described their performance as a “commentary on what it means to be Two-Spirit and Aboriginal in Alberta.” The performance juxtaposed shots of an oil refinery with the surrounding lands and waters of their homeland.

Jonathon Adams sings “Thus Says the Lord” + “But Who Can Dwell” in “Messiah / Complex” at the Against the Grain Theater.

AtG has featured singers outside of the Western classical tradition, many of whom are also songwriters or songwriters. However, their composition skills were not showcased. AtG’s decision to ask the Toronto Symphony Orchestra to provide the backing tracks may suggest that, to combat the industry’s dominant whiteness, nothing in the sound of Western classical music needs change – that all it takes is to employ more indigenous, black and racialized artists. But this approach ignores criticisms of how the sounds and values ​​of classical music can “be a structural barrier to diversification,” as noted Chris Jenkins, violist, musicologist and associate dean at the Oberlin Conservatory.

Agency for singers and musicians

Soundstreams has given singers and musicians more agency over music. Adam Scime, composer and musical director of the 2020 edition of Electric Messiah, notes that they invite the musicians involved in each iteration to “bring their own voice to sculpt the project” and that they “give everyone a foothold. equal collaboration “.

As per Robinson’s recommendations, the individual artists of Electric Messiah maintained sovereignty over their segments. Meanwhile, viewers are encouraged to appreciate the differences between, for example, the turntable of SlowPitchSound, O Death, O Grave by Métis and French-Canadian composer Ian Cusson and Scime’s chorus “Hallelujah” reimagined as a dance party on the beach. In doing so, Soundstreams not only explored new and more equitable ways of working together, but the sonic results challenged the hegemony of the Western classical tradition.

Messiah / Complex is available to stream on demand until January 9, 2022. Soundstreams will release a new version of Electric Messiah in April 2022.

MENAFN23122021000199003603ID1103438469


Source link

]]>
How classical music confronts its colonial past and present https://ziad-rahbani.com/how-classical-music-confronts-its-colonial-past-and-present/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 15:12:07 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/how-classical-music-confronts-its-colonial-past-and-present/ No work of Western classical music is more closely associated with the Christmas season than German-born composer George Frideric Handel Messiah, which was established in 1742. In recent years, the public has been able to choose between performances modeled on those of the composer’s time, performances following the 19th century tradition of massive choirs and […]]]>

No work of Western classical music is more closely associated with the Christmas season than German-born composer George Frideric Handel Messiah, which was established in 1742.

In recent years, the public has been able to choose between performances modeled on those of the composer’s time, performances following the 19th century tradition of massive choirs and modern instruments and even staged and choreographed interpretations work. When COVID-19 reduced live performance, online video presentations became a new medium.

This was following global protests over the murder of George Floyd and a global revitalization of Black Lives Matter. Among artists from different industries, classical black artists as baritone Andrew Adridge, in conversation with writer Michael Zarathus-Cook, called for classical music to solve systemic problems. He noted, “There is a problem with race in… arts organizations because there is a problem in Canada” and “avoiding conversations” will not help.

In a separate article, Zarathus-Cook wrote of how “we need to recognize that the protests we have seen are being spurred both by the urgent need for a radical assessment of the police force and of how they interact with [Black, Indigenous and people of colour], and the a more subtle, culturally diffused daily racism that is not triggered by a premature trigger, but by words and social cues which remind the racialized peoples of this country that they are irrevocably outward looking. “

Even before the global Black Lives Matter protests, a 2018 report written for the nonprofit Orchestras Canada by writer and arts consultant Soraya Peerbaye and violinist and ethnomusicologist Parmela Attariwala documents “Systemic inequality and coloniality in Canadian orchestras”, ranging from orchestral management and governance structures to their repertoire and working methods. Music scholars have also been grappling with the colonial heritage of classical music, including Handel’s investments in the slave trade.

Two interpretations of “Messiah”

In December 2020, the Toronto Theater against grain (AtG) and Sound stream produces pre-recorded movies based on the Messiah which was streamed for free on YouTube. Both organizations have shown creative ingenuity to pivot quickly into the pandemic to produce digital content and provide jobs for artists in the early months of COVID-19 as the precariousness of artists’ livelihoods grew increasingly Claire.

How these two Canadian companies chose to respond to our contemporary context of anti-racist appeals by interpreting Messiah provides an opportunity to have a conversation about how performers and audiences of Western classical music can more fully engage in anti-colonial and anti-racist work.

To these questions we, two white settler scholars, bring our combined research expertise into 18th century music and how independent opera companies in Canada are help works of the past to talk about contemporary issues. One of us (Nina) is involved in a project, “Exploring New Models of Collaboration in Indigenous Directed Opera in Canada. “This collaboration is with Amplified Opera, a Toronto-based collective that inspires audiences to “Embrace diverse and stimulating cultural experiences. “

Against the ‘Messiah / Complex’ of the Grain

The new interpretation of the theater Against the Grain Messiah, Messiah / Complex, hopes to support Indigenous and under-represented voices as part of their mandate to present familiar pieces “in innovative ways and in unusual places”. They decided to present Handel’s orchestral music as originally written, which would be performed by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, but they hired all of the native, black, or racialized solo singers, 12 in total.

Joel Ivany, Founder and Artistic Director of AtG, has teamed up with Reneltta Arluk, Director of Akpik Theater and of Indigenous arts at the Banff Center for Arts and Creativity co-direct the production. Ivany relayed that the artists were invited to choose the interpretation framework and language for their performances. The film features segments in Arabic, Dene, English, Inuktitut, Inuttitut, French and Southern Tutchone.

Features in the New York Times, BBC (endorsed by Margaret Atwood) and other major media won the film more than 138,000 views in 44 countries. Art journalist Brad Wheeler, writing in the Globe and Mail, described him as a “An impressive lesson in reconciliation and inclusion”, while a New York Times title on the story of writer Dan Bilefsky said Handel’s work “Freed from the bonds of history”.

Soundstreams’ “Electric Messiah”

Another production based on Handel’s work, Electric Messiah by Soundstreams was billed as “A complete video clip that reinvents Handel’s classic for today’s world” and “brings the past to life in a new way that reflects the city we live in”.

In agreement with Soundstreams mandate to showcase the work of living composers, the company has made minimal changes to the lyrics. Instead, the artists combine these lyrics with new music with influences from electronic dance music, pop and hip hop.

Electric Messiah was also well received but reached a smaller and mostly local public.

The colonial legacy of classical music

Chez Peerbaye and Attariwala Orchestras Canada Report, they call on Canadian orchestras “to create non-hierarchical environments in which artistic investigations of Indigenous artists and artists of color can take place.” Engaging in “broader conversations about the experiences of Indigenous peoples, people of color and other equity-seeking communities” will enable orchestras to “cultivate equal and reciprocal relationships that meaningfully support artistic research. current ”.

These recommendations are included in Hungry Listening: Resonance Theory for Native Sound Studies, a recent book by Stó: lō scholar and artist Dylan Robinson. He notes that the problem with the inclusion of more diverse artists and traditions, without changing existing working methods, is that even the “best integration intentions continue to strengthen and maintain the hierarchical dominance of artistic music by as a genre to which other music must conform. “

Fair collaborations with musicians from other traditions will involve working in new ways. Robinson also recommends highlighting the irreconcilability of different musical traditions. Allowing these differences to be heard could promote greater openness to the idea that reconciliation cannot be achieved through the “inclusion” of Aboriginal people in existing colonial models.

New interpretive frameworks

In Messiah / Complex, some artists have expressed the Indigenous resurgence by singing in Indigenous languages ​​or challenging Western classical and colonial tropes. Baritone Nêhiyaw-Michif (Cris-Métis) Jonathon Adams describes their performance like a “Commentary on what it means to be Two-Spirit and Aboriginal in Alberta”. The performance juxtaposed shots of an oil refinery with the surrounding lands and waters of their homeland.

Jonathon Adams sings “Thus Says the Lord” + “But Who Can Dwell” in “Messiah / Complex” at the Against the Grain Theater.

AtG has featured singers outside of the Western classical tradition, several of whom are also songwriters Where composers. However, their composition skills were not showcased. AtG’s decision to ask the Toronto Symphony Orchestra to provide the backing tracks may suggest that, to combat the industry’s dominant whiteness, nothing in the sound of Western classical music needs change – that all it takes is to employ more indigenous, black and racialized artists. But this approach ignores criticisms of how the sounds and values ​​of classical music can “constitute a structural obstacle to diversification”, as noted by Chris Jenkins, violist, musicologist and associate dean at the Oberlin Conservatory.

Agency for singers and musicians

Soundstreams has given singers and musicians more agency over music. Adam Scime, composer and musical director of the 2020 edition of Electric Messiah, note that they invite the musicians involved in each iteration to “Bring their own voice to sculpt the project” and that they “give everyone a collaborative level playing field”.

In accordance with Robinson’s recommendations, the individual artists of Electric Messiah maintained sovereignty over their segments. Meanwhile, viewers are encouraged to appreciate the differences between, for example, SlowPitchSoundPlatinism by, Métis and French-Canadian composer Ian cusson dead, oh grave, and Scime’s chorus “Hallelujah” reinvented as a dance party on the beach. In doing so, Soundstreams not only explored new and more equitable ways of working together, but the sonic results challenged the hegemony of the Western classical tradition.

Messiah / Complex is available for streaming on demand until January 9, 2022. Soundstreams will release a new version of Electric Messiah in April 2022.


Source link

]]>
Classical music takes off during the holidays https://ziad-rahbani.com/classical-music-takes-off-during-the-holidays/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 22:00:36 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/classical-music-takes-off-during-the-holidays/ Breadcrumb Links Music Local arts Author of the article: Marc Morris The Alberta Baroque Ensemble. Photo by provided /Postmedia The opinions and recommendations are impartial and the products are selected independently. Postmedia may earn an affiliate commission on purchases made through links on this page. Content of the article If you’ve had enough of the […]]]>

Content of the article

If you’ve had enough of the endless canned arrangements of Christmas carols and seasonal songs blaring out of metallic-sounding mall speakers, but still love music, don’t despair.

Advertising

Content of the article

While some of Edmonton’s classical music organizations and choirs won’t emerge from their pandemic hibernation until the New Year, there is more than enough live gigs to bring the season back to life and some joy. in musical creation.

Rooted in tradition

The month of December kicks off with a long tradition of Handel’s much-loved oratorio, The Messiah at Winspear.

The Richard Eaton Singers and the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra will be joined by an excellent trio of soloists from Alberta who have performed regularly with the choir. Two of them are voice teachers, soprano Sherry Steele currently teaches voice at the University of Alberta and Calgary bass Paul Grindlay teaches at the Mount Royal Conservatory. Internationally renowned third tenor John Tessier needs little introduction and has recently returned from performing in Milan’s famous La Scala opera house. Leonard Ratzlaff, Music Director of the Richard Eaton Singers, is leading the performances this weekend, December 3 and 4 at 7:30 p.m.

Advertising

Content of the article

Leonard Ratzlaff will conduct the Richard Eaton Singers and Handel's Messiah of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra this weekend.
Leonard Ratzlaff will conduct the Richard Eaton Singers and Handel’s Messiah of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra this weekend. Photo by provided /Postmedia

Earlier in the afternoon of Friday, you can sing Christmas carols yourself at Winspear during the 20th Christmas Carol Sing-Along. The event is scheduled for 12 p.m. and admission is by donation.

Modern Favorites

ESO itself organizes a variety of Christmas concerts. Conductor Alexander Prior is used to presenting more serious traditional music, but this year he is conducting the Christmas “pops” concert, called Holiday Magic, which runs from December 18 to 22.

“It’s a new kind of thing for me to do,” says the UK-born prior. “It’s going to be fun embracing the North American style of Christmas music. I can’t wait to be there, and the blackmail aspect. I hope a lot of children will come – it will be full of Christmas magic.

Advertising

Content of the article

The concert features classic American songs such as Frosty the Snowman and holiday movie hits from Frozen to How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and some of Prior’s favorites, “Little Drummer Boy and the Music of Home Alone!”

An older ESO concert, A Traditional Christmas, will feature in its program a range of songs familiar to Bach, Corelli and extracts from The Nutcracker, conducted by assistant conductor Cosette Justo Valdés on December 17, 18 and 23. It’s something of a new experience for her too, as those traditional Christmas carols weren’t heard in Cuba where she grew up.

ESO continues to probe the seasonal spirit with another Winspear concert series titled Hollywood for the Holidays. Samples of Star Wars, The Sound of Music, Beauty and the Beast and The Nightmare Before Christmas will be part of the program. Lucas Waldin, a regular ESO guest in this genre of music, conducts all four performances from December 28 to 30.

Advertising

Content of the article

Choir songs

Cantilon Choirs returns to Winspear on December 12 at 2:30 p.m. with six separate choirs, four composed of singers aged four to 19 and two groups of adults. They will present their traditional Ceremony of Carols concert in their first post-COVID live performance.

Another choral organization with performers of all ages is Kokopelli Choirs. There are seven ensembles, for a total of almost 400 singers, and they return for a traditional and large-scale annual winter celebration concert. There will be two performances at McDougall United Church on December 21 at 2 pm and 7:30 pm Music will include the Christmas arrangement in the trenches by Allison Girvan, Norwegian Christmas carols and music by Mozart . The concerts will conclude with the premiere of a Laura Hawley arrangement of The First Snow of the Year by Canadian singer-songwriter Hawksley Workman.

Advertising

Content of the article

Further on, the Strathcona String Quartet is the special guest on the Augustana Campus of the University of Alberta for the Augustana Choir Christmas concert, entitled Language of the Stars. It includes music by Mendelssohn and Mozart and Christmas classics performed at the Faith & Life Chapel on Augustana Campusin Camrose this Saturday, December 4 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will also be broadcast live on Youtube .

Unusual offers

Two other events have become seasonal traditions and may appeal to those looking for something a little different.

The Alberta Baroque Ensemble presents its Music concert for a festive season on December 12. There are three works: In Dulci Jubilo by the 17th century Danish composer Dieterich Buxtehude, the famous Christmas Concerto by Corelli and the Magnificat by the lesser known Francesco Durante, an 18th century Neapolitan composer.

Advertising

Content of the article

The ensemble will be joined by soprano Aemilia Moser and the Scona Chamber Singers, and will be conducted by John Brough.

David Lang’s original production of Little Match Girl by Pro Coro was so successful that it has become an annual event for the Edmonton Professional Choir. It is a choral work – the singers also playing percussion – based on the famous story of Hans Christian Andersen, and it won the Pulitzer Prize for music in 2008.

Pro Coro will perform the Pulitzer Prize winning production of Hans Christian Andersen's Little Match Girl on December 19.
Pro Coro will perform the Pulitzer Prize winning production of Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Match Girl on December 19. Photo by provided /Postmedia

This year’s show will take place at All Saints Anglican Cathedral at 7:30 p.m. on December 19.

Finally, New Years wouldn’t be the same without Viennese music, and Winspear has its own Viennese New Years concert on January 2 at 2:30 p.m., presented by Attila Glatz Concert Productions. Entitled Salute to Vienna, it features dancers in period costumes and ESO playing familiar tunes, including, of course, the Blue Danube Waltz.

yegarts@postmedia.com

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a vibrant but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Visit our Community rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail The settings.


Source link

]]>
Who was Charles Wesley? – Classical music https://ziad-rahbani.com/who-was-charles-wesley-classical-music/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 16:26:40 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/who-was-charles-wesley-classical-music/ Who was Charles Wesley? You might not recognize his name, but you will likely recognize some of his words and even sing them. Charles Wesley was one of the most prolific and illustrious hymn writers in the world, writing over 6,500 hymns during his lifetime. Some of his most famous works include ‘Divine Love, All […]]]>

Who was Charles Wesley?

You might not recognize his name, but you will likely recognize some of his words and even sing them. Charles Wesley was one of the most prolific and illustrious hymn writers in the world, writing over 6,500 hymns during his lifetime. Some of his most famous works include ‘Divine Love, All Excellent Loves‘, Hear the Herald Angels sing‘, and’ Here! He comes with descending clouds’. Let’s face it – a Christmas carol service wouldn’t be the same without a hearty rendition of “Hark The Herald Angels Sing,” which we’ve named one of the best christmas carols ever.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_iLXNSIAYc

Charles and his brother John Wesley founded the Methodist Church in the mid-18th century.

When and where was Charles Wesley born?

Charles Wesley was born December 18, 1707 in Epworth, Lincolnshire. He was the son of Anglican cleric and poet Samuel Wesley, and like his father, he was ordained a priest in the Anglican Church in 1735.

In April 1749, Charles Wesley married Sarah Gwynne. They went on to have three children, including Charles Wesley Jr, who was the royal family’s personal organist.

When did Charles Wesley die?

Charles Wesley died on March 29, 1788, at the age of 80, in London.

10 hymns and songs by Charles Wesley

  • Divine Love, All Excellent Loves
  • Hear the Herald Angels sing
  • Get up, my soul, get up
  • Depth of mercy, can it be
  • So ! He comes with descending clouds
  • Christ, whose glory fills the heavens
  • Come you long awaited jesus
  • And should I win?
  • Rejoice, the Lord is King
  • Father, I hold out my hands to you

Find the lyrics to many of your favorite Christmas carols and hymns


Source link

]]>
Songs and melodies of classical music bring a sense of oneness – Twin Cities https://ziad-rahbani.com/songs-and-melodies-of-classical-music-bring-a-sense-of-oneness-twin-cities/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 16:21:48 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/songs-and-melodies-of-classical-music-bring-a-sense-of-oneness-twin-cities/ After the COVID-19 Grinch stole Christmas last year, the festive spirit is returning better than ever. Whether you survived Zoom’s classical music performances to get your vacation fix or avoided concert music, you will feel good to come together and enjoy the Christmas carols and melodies that bring a warm feeling. unit. Bach’s Christmas Oratorio […]]]>

After the COVID-19 Grinch stole Christmas last year, the festive spirit is returning better than ever. Whether you survived Zoom’s classical music performances to get your vacation fix or avoided concert music, you will feel good to come together and enjoy the Christmas carols and melodies that bring a warm feeling. unit.

Bach’s Christmas Oratorio

December 3: The VocalEssence Ensemble Singers and the Bach Society of Minnesota present the 6-part Christmas Oratorio by Johann Sebastian Bach. It begins with the birth of Jesus and tells the story of Christmas, with shepherds and angels, throughout the wise men visiting the swaddled baby on Epiphany. Dotted with Lutheran hymns and choral music, as well as original arias composed by Bach himself, the work will immerse you in a Baroque holiday atmosphere. VocalEssence Artistic Director and VocalEssence Founder Philip Brunelle teams up with Bach Society of Minnesota conductor Matthias Maute as they conduct their respective ensembles for the experience. 7:30 p.m., Sainte-Marie Basilica; 612-371-5656 or minnesotaorchestra.org.

And VocalEssence presents its annual “Welcome Christmas” concert on December 12 at the Lutheran Church in Roseville. (vocalessence.org)

HANDEL: Messiah sings

December 5: Get in on the action singing with the Minnesota Choir. In “Messiah Sing,” the choral ensemble invites the audience to participate in the annual tradition, which took place online last year. Led by Minnesota Choral Artistic Director Kathy Saltzman Romey with guest organist Lynn Trapp, it’s an evening of Handel’s beloved oratorio, filled with familiar choral songs and painfully beautiful recitatives. 6.30 p.m. St. Olaf Catholic Church, 2901 N. Emerson Ave., Minneapolis; offering of free will; 612-333-4866 or mnchorale.org.

The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra performs Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos over two weekends. (Photo courtesy of SPCO)

SPCO: Brandenburg Concertos by Bach

December 9-19: The Saint-Paul Chamber Orchestra gets into the holiday spirit with a Johann Sebastian Bach marathon. Performing Bach’s six concertos in two different programs, the series takes place over two weeks. While not specifically written as a holiday piece of music, it is one of the most sublime pieces in baroque music and is a worthy addition to your holiday entertainment schedule. SPCO will play Concertos 1, 2 and 3 on the first weekend, and 4, 5 and 6 on the second weekend, with a special performance and discussion on Concerto 2 with Rob Kapilow on December 16. Ordway Concert Hall, 345 Washington St., St.. Paul; $ 50 to $ 12; 651-291-1144 or thespco.org.

Songs of the season – Carols by Minnesota Composers

December 16: Minnesota composers offer their own Christmas songs and carols for this free concert. Composer Abbie Betinis hosts the evening, which is free and seats are allocated on a first come, first served basis. It is part of the Courtroom Concert series, so named because they took place in the past in Courtroom 217 of the Landmark Center, although this concert takes place at the Central Presbyterian Church. Noon; Central Presbyterian Church, 500 Cedar Street, St. Paul; 651-292-3268 or shubert.org.)

“Christmas with Cantus” returns. (Photo courtesy of Cantus)

Christmas with Cantus

December 17: The angelic male vocal ensemble from the Twin Cities, which delights audiences with its rich harmonies and inspired arrangements, takes the stage at the Ordway Concert Hall for their holiday performance. The performance weaves Christmas carols and new songs with three different stories, including an original track, “Dakota and the Snow Phoenix”. The stories “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” and “The Year of the Perfect Christmas Tree” will also be on the program. 7:30 p.m. The Ordway Concert Hall, 345 Washington St., St. Paul; 651-224-4222 or orway.org.

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra will make Christmas vibrate. (Photo by Jason McEachern)

Trans-Siberian Orchestra

December 27: Rock music, orchestral sounds and choral music weave into the vibrant annual tradition of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. The band made their debut in 1996, when producer and songwriter Paul O’Neill brought together a group of rock and heavy metal musicians to create a Christmas show. “Christmas Eve and Other Stories” follows the journey of a young angel sent to Earth to help human beings. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Excel Energy Center, 199 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul; $ 96 to $ 25; 651-265-4800 or xcelenergycenter.com.

Minnesota Orchestra: A New Years Celebration

December 31 and January 1: Kick off the Minnesota Orchestra’s long-awaited Sibelius concert with this New Year’s Eve celebration. You will hear two Sibelian symphonies conducted by music director Osmo Vänskä, with Finnish soprano Helena Juntunen. The New Years Eve show will include a countdown to midnight and jazz music courtesy of Belle Amour, as well as a complimentary champagne toast. 8:30 p.m. Dec. 31 2 p.m. Jan 1; Orchestra Hall, 1111 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis; 612-371-5600 or mnorchestra.org.


Source link

]]>
Stephen Sondheim: Composer’s Best Musicals https://ziad-rahbani.com/stephen-sondheim-composers-best-musicals/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 23:53:33 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/stephen-sondheim-composers-best-musicals/ Stephen Sondheim has changed the face of musical theater across the world, through his iconic scores, lyrics and unique collaborations with other leading composers. His unequivocal mastery of humor and language have been some of the most beloved turns of phrase ever performed on stage, and over his 60-year career he has helped transform theater […]]]>

Stephen Sondheim has changed the face of musical theater across the world, through his iconic scores, lyrics and unique collaborations with other leading composers. His unequivocal mastery of humor and language have been some of the most beloved turns of phrase ever performed on stage, and over his 60-year career he has helped transform theater and push the boundaries of it. that was possible.

What are Stephen Sondheim’s best musicals?

Society

The 1970 musical Society revolves around the character of Robert, a single man unable to engage in a relationship. He is surrounded by married couples, friends and ex-girlfriends, whose lives, relationships and complications we follow throughout the musical. They are all brought together by Robert’s 35th birthday. Originally written as a play, Sondheim was brought in to build a musical.

If you’re unfamiliar with the musical itself, you might recognize the manic song “Getting Married Today”, in which Amy’s character sings 69 words in 11 seconds. It’s a challenge for any artist – and an absolute riot for members of the public.

West Side Story

Sondheim’s collaboration with Leonard Bernstein when he was just 27 not only helped launch his career, but has remained one of his most beloved works. As a lyricist on West Side Story, he created iconic songs such as “Tonight”, “Somewhere” and “America”. He may have ended up personally regretting the lyrics “This is alarming how charming I feel” in Maria’s song “I Feel Pretty”, but it’s safe to say we all forgive him.

In addition to an Oscar-winning film adaptation in 1961, West Side Story is set to reincarnate again – this time in a Hollywood blockbuster directed by Steven Spielberg. Sondheim participated in the registration process for this new adaptation of West Side Story. He joined the music supervisors in the vocal booth during filming. “Stephen Sondheim is a genius – a word I use very rarely,” says Tony Kushner, the playwright who wrote the screenplay for this new West Side Story adaptation for large screen.

In the woods

In the woods is based on several of the Brothers Grimm’s fairy tales, all of which have been tied around each other for great storytelling effect. The protagonists include Little Red Riding Hood, Jack (and the Beanstalk), Rapunzel and Cinderella. The music and finely crafted lyrics are as witty and tight as the plot, with musical motifs that come back time and time again.

As well as numerous West End and Broadway covers, In the woods received a film adaptation in 2014, starring Anna Kendrick, Meryl Streep, Emily Blunt and James Corden.

Sweeney Todd: The Barber Demon of Fleet Street

A character made popular in the penny dreadfuls of the Victorian era, Sweeney Todd is a murderous barber. In the musical adaptation of Sondheim, Todd lives above a pie shop owned by a Mrs. Lovett, with whom he mercilessly plots. He has received Broadway and West End tours, concert productions with the New York Philharmonic and San Francisco Symphony, and an English National Opera production.

Like all good musicals from Sondheim, Sweeney todd received a successful film adaptation, starring Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter as Sweeney Todd and Mrs Lovett.


Source link

]]>
Musical theater legend Stephen Sondheim has died aged 91 https://ziad-rahbani.com/musical-theater-legend-stephen-sondheim-has-died-aged-91/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 23:16:42 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/musical-theater-legend-stephen-sondheim-has-died-aged-91/ Stephen Sondheim, Broadway legend and one of the world’s most influential songwriters and lyricists, has died at the age of 91. There are few composers and lyricists who have had such a seismic impact on the world of musical theater like Stephen Sondheim. He wrote the music and lyrics for some of Broadway’s best musicals, […]]]>

Stephen Sondheim, Broadway legend and one of the world’s most influential songwriters and lyricists, has died at the age of 91.

There are few composers and lyricists who have had such a seismic impact on the world of musical theater like Stephen Sondheim. He wrote the music and lyrics for some of Broadway’s best musicals, from Society To In the woods, all of which have enjoyed lasting success and are still performed on amateur and professional stages around the world. In addition to his solo musicals, he has also worked with renowned composers as a lyricist, writing lyrics on the sheet music of West Side Story (1957) and Gypsy (1959) by Leonard Bernstein and Jule Styne respectively.

In his early years, Sondheim trained with Oscar Hammerstein II (half of the Rogers and Hammerstein duo), as well as avant-garde composer Milton Babbitt. It was always the songwriting that appealed to Sondheim the most. “I’m interested in theater because I’m interested in communicating with audiences,” he told NPR. Fresh air presenter Terry Gross in 2010. “Otherwise, I would be in concert music. I love the theater as much as I love music.

His musical comedies differ tremendously in style, subject and format, some like Society meditating on middle age and monogamy, but described as Sondheim as a “no plot” musical, and others as Sunday at the park with George inspired by a painting by Georges Suerat and taking place over 100 years. The awards were plentiful and swift, as Sondheim won the Tony and Drama Critics Circle Awards for Society, Follies, A little night music, Sweeney todd, In the woods and Passion.

His 1984 production of Sunday at the park with George won him a Pulitzer Prize for theater, which he created with director James Lapine, famous for his avant-garde and visually stimulating approach to theater.

He has also moved away from the theater on several occasions to write film scores and songs for the cinema, including “Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man)”, which was sung by Madonna in the 1990 film. Dick tracy and won Sondheim an Academy Award.

Many of his musicals have been adapted for the big screen, including Sweeney Todd: Fleet Street Barber Demon, which was directed by Tim Burton and starred Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter as Sweeney and Mrs Lovett; In the woods, released in 2014, receiving three Oscar nominations; and West Side Story, first adapted for cinema in 1961, four years after his stage debut. It was then adapted again into a film released in 2021 under the direction of Steven Spielberg, with Ansel Elgort and Rachel Zegler as Tony and Maria. The Film adaptation 2021 should be out in a few weeks.

Here, we name the best musicals of Stephen Sondheim.


Source link

]]>
Best Christmas Musicals – Classical Music https://ziad-rahbani.com/best-christmas-musicals-classical-music/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 13:09:04 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/best-christmas-musicals-classical-music/ Party musicals are definitely a thing, but maybe they’re not as important as you think they are, and maybe they’re not getting the recognition they deserve. Here in the UK, the holidays mean Panto season, so a Christmas musical might be the last thing we think about. That hasn’t stopped composers from tempting Christmas on […]]]>

Party musicals are definitely a thing, but maybe they’re not as important as you think they are, and maybe they’re not getting the recognition they deserve. Here in the UK, the holidays mean Panto season, so a Christmas musical might be the last thing we think about.

That hasn’t stopped composers from tempting Christmas on Broadway and the West End, but it’s perhaps the big-screen musicals that remain the most memorable. Who doesn’t like snuggling up to a cocoa pod to watch Michael Caine sing along with the Muppets? More on them later.

As with “ordinary” musicals, the stage and screen have regularly fed on each other, which means that there are Christmas musicals based on Christmas movies based on musicals. . Confused? Don’t worry, take another chocolate out of the box and discover our selection of the best Christmas musicals…

The best Christmas musicals

How the Grinch Stole Dr Seuss Christmas

(1966/94/2006)

Who wants to grab Christmas, when we can just steal it? Dr. Seuss’ classic children’s book is a perennial favorite, adapted for the screen in 1966, 2000 and 2018. This musical made a cameo appearance in the 90s, having a slightly bigger impact on Broadway in 2006/7 , before being filmed for a TV Special in 2020. Music and songs are by Mel Marvin, with lyrics by Timothy Mason. It uses the 1966 songs “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” and “Welcome, Christmas”, written by Albert Hague, with lyrics by Dr. Seuss himself.

Best song… “You’re a bad guy, Mr. Grinch”

Buy the DVD

The nightmare before Christmas

(1994)
If you’re one of those people who like to start Christmas early, here’s a great one to start things off in October. That’s right, Tim Burton’s animated cult classic musical is set on Halloween and Xmas. Composer Danny Elfman wrote the songs and the score for this dazzlingly dark tale about the King of Halloweentown, who decides he too wants to grab Christmas and bring some joy to his fellow ghouls.

Best song… ‘What is this ?!’

Buy the DVD

Scrooge

(1970/92)

The late composer / lyricist Leslie Bricusse adapted A Christmas Carol, creating this seminal seasonal musical. Originally a Oscar nominee 1970 film with Albert Finney in the title role, Bricusse returned to it in 1992 and reimagined it as a staging. The classic story of miser Ebenezer Scrooge has come to life on screen and on stage, the latter being seen around the world in numerous touring productions.

Best song… “Thank you very much”

Buy DVD

A Christmas Carol

(1994/2004)

Oscar-winning composer Alan Menken (Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin) turned his hand to Dickens for a new story musical in 1994. With lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, the show was an annual fixture at Madison Square Garden in New York City for a decade. He drew some big names in the lead role, including F. Murray Abraham, Jim Dale, Roger Daltrey and Frank Langella. It was adapted into a TV movie in 2004, starring Kelsey Grammer as Scrooge. Concerts of the show have also been held since.

Best song… “Christmas together”

Buy the DVD

The Muppets’ Christmas Carol

(1992)

The story is familiar, but the faces are a bit more blurry. Michael Caine plays Scrooge in this memorable tale of the festive and chilling story of Dickens. Gonzo the Great guides us through history, which is peppered with catchy songs by Oscar-winning songwriter / songwriter Paul Williams – a regular with the Muppets, having written Kermit’s classic “Rainbow Connection”.

Best song… ‘One More Sleep’ til Christmas’

Buy the soundtrack on Amazon

Buy DVD

Elf

(2010)

Yes Elf is also a musical. This Broadway musical by Matthew Sklar and Chad Begulein is fast becoming a modern classic. Based on the hugely popular 2003 film of the same name, starring Will Ferrell, it tells the same story of Buddy – a human raised by elves who returns to New York City to find his father.

Best song… ‘Sparklejollytwinklejingley’

Buy the original recording of the London casting

Meet me in Saint-Louis

(1944)

(1944)

Released in time for the American vacation in 1944, Meet me in Saint-Louis is not just about Christmas. That said, this Year in the Life of the Smith Family (1903/04) has Christmas at its heart and presents what has become one of the most universally loved Christmas carols. “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” was written for the film by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane, and is memorably performed by Judy Garland. She sings it to her little sister, who is sad to move to a new city and fears Santa Claus won’t find them.

Best song… ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas’

Buy the DVD

White christmas

(1954/2000)
Rather, the title gives the most famous song from this musical, although Irving Berlin didn’t write it for it. He actually appeared in a 1942 film titled Holiday Inn, but was brought back for this fully seasonal offering with Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, and Rosemary Clooney. A musical about Broadway stars putting on a show at a Vermont hotel over Christmas to help out an old army buddy, it’s as charming, warm and funny as you’d expect. It also features the popular “Sisters” issue. It was adapted for the stage in 2000.

Best song… ‘White Christmas’ (obviously)

Buy the DVD

The Polar Express

(2004)
Okay, so it’s not a wall-to-wall song and dance, but there are its moments… and some of them are a little dark. Based on the children’s book of the same name by Chris van Allsburg, director Robert Zemeckis broke new ground with this film. Using the very latest in performance capture technology, it was animation like audiences had never seen before. Tom Hanks plays multiple roles in the story, which follows a mysterious / magical train that gives kids the ride of a lifetime on a memorable Christmas night. The original songs are by Alan Silvestri and Glen Ballard.

Best song… “When Christmas comes to town”

Buy the DVD

Rudolph the red nosed reindeer

(1964)
It has become somewhat of an institution in the United States, where it has been shown on television every year since its premiere in 1964. It of course tells the story of everyone’s favorite reindeer – the one with the very bright nose. This song is at the heart of the story, but it features a string of other numbers, also written by “Rudolph” composer Johnny Marks, which have become synonymous with the season for millions of people.

Best Song… ‘Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer’

Buy the DVD

Want to snuggle up and watch some of these family Christmas musicals? So look at our sister title The Christmas section of Your Home Style for ideas and inspiration. Here are some of our favorites below

Best Image Credit: Getty Images


Source link

]]>
10-Year-Old Mahati Subramanium, 3rd Generation of Famous Classical Music Family, Releases First Video: Watch | Music https://ziad-rahbani.com/10-year-old-mahati-subramanium-3rd-generation-of-famous-classical-music-family-releases-first-video-watch-music/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/10-year-old-mahati-subramanium-3rd-generation-of-famous-classical-music-family-releases-first-video-watch-music/ MUMBAI – Multi-talented 10-year-old singer, songwriter, violinist and pianist Mahati Subramaniam has released her first music video, “How We Feel”. Mahati is a third generation artist, from the distinguished musical family of the Subramaniams, called the first family of classical musicians in India. Mahati is the granddaughter of the mainstays of the music industry, Dr […]]]>

MUMBAI – Multi-talented 10-year-old singer, songwriter, violinist and pianist Mahati Subramaniam has released her first music video, “How We Feel”. Mahati is a third generation artist, from the distinguished musical family of the Subramaniams, called the first family of classical musicians in India.

Mahati is the granddaughter of the mainstays of the music industry, Dr L. Subramaniam and Kavita Krishnamurti Subramaniam and the daughter of Bindu Subramaniam, an acclaimed singer-songwriter who is also the co-founder and CEO of SaPa (Subramaniam Academy of Performing Arts).

“We are immensely proud of Mahati. She worked really hard to hone her skills and come up with such an inspiring song. She strives to be perfect at what she does, and in this video she has performed exceptionally well. It just looks splendid! says Dr L Subramaniam.

In addition to composing, writing and singing the song, Mahati also played the violin and did gymnastics in the music video. Mahati has been working on her dream of becoming a professional artist from an early age and started learning music at the age of 2 !!

“My song is about ‘the life of tweens’ and its struggles. It depicts the emotions of pre-teens, who sometimes find it difficult to share their feelings with loved ones. As I sang in my song, “sometimes we have to be the leaders and other times the teachers”. Through this song I want to carry the message to all the tweens that we often have our friends to support us and help us deal with our problems or conflicts, however, to lead a healthy and happy life we ​​must learn to be our own best friends first! Mahati said.

Mahati performed live with his grandparents at events such as the Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival and was also part of the Duroflex Sounds of Sleep Session campaign. She has been a part of various ensembles and worked with some of the country’s greatest artists including Aruna Sairam, The Thayir Sadam Project (a Carnatic fusion collection that has received millions of views on social media) and many more. .

Bindu Subramaniam commented with joy, “We couldn’t be more proud of Mahati and his achievements. It’s so wonderful to see her create this whole piece of music on her own. She has always had clear ambitions in life, and we are delighted to see her take such a step. There is immense potential in her, and it’s great to see her become an artistic person and carry on the legacy. “


Source link

]]>
New research reveals shocking barriers to young people ‘s access to classical music https://ziad-rahbani.com/new-research-reveals-shocking-barriers-to-young-people-s-access-to-classical-music/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://ziad-rahbani.com/new-research-reveals-shocking-barriers-to-young-people-s-access-to-classical-music/ 12 November 2021, 15:57 Chineke conducted by Roderick Cox at the Royal Festival Hall. Photo: Mark Allan A report by Arts Council England found that accessibility to classical music is under threat as young people from high-income families are significantly over-represented in the industry’s elite training opportunities. New research has revealed the urgent need to […]]]>

12 November 2021, 15:57

Chineke conducted by Roderick Cox at the Royal Festival Hall.

Photo: Mark Allan


A report by Arts Council England found that accessibility to classical music is under threat as young people from high-income families are significantly over-represented in the industry’s elite training opportunities.

New research has revealed the urgent need to improve access to orchestras and the classical music sector at large.

Create more inclusive classical music, a period of six years to study of the English orchestral workforce, and current avenues for becoming part of it, questioned workers in the classical music industry.

Of more than 960 people working in classical music, almost half were from London and the South East, only a tiny part of Yorkshire, the North West or the Midlands.

The report also showed that 80 percent of classical musicians grew up in wealthier areas where a high proportion of the population attended university.

Other disturbing results show that a quarter of women in the industry faced financial barriers such as low wages, and about half of LGBTQ + respondents, respondents with disabilities, and Black, Asian and other respondents. ethnicities said they had faced barriers limiting opportunities.

Chi-chi Nwanoku OBE, Founder and Artistic Director and Executive, Chineke! Orchestra, and presenter Classic FM, commented on the report’s findings, saying: “We will never know how many talented people could have achieved worldwide fame if given a fair chance, regardless of their origin or background.” “

Arts Council England published a response to the report on its website, with an action plan to unlock musical talent across England by working with orchestras, music teachers, broadcasters and record labels.

“Too many people are currently facing barriers, real or perceived, to entering, staying and being successful in the industry,” the response from Arts Council England read.

“We want to work with the sector to make classical music more inclusive and more representative of England as it is today, and we’ve put together a plan to help do that. “

The Arts Council is committed, over the next three years, to working directly with orchestras, venues and promoters to ensure fair and inclusive treatment in the industry.

He will also commission a major research project to understand children’s relationship with classical music and its impact on their decision to learn a musical instrument, as well as a long-term action research project aimed at supporting young people from various backgrounds interested in a career in the music industry.

Read more: Research shows huge increase in millennials and millennials in classical music streaming

Dr Darren Henley OBE, Managing Director of Arts Council England and former Managing Director of Classic FM, asked, “When was the last time you listened to a piece of classical music?

“It’s very likely that it’s in an advertisement or a movie. And your favorite pop songs may owe as much to Mozart, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff as to more recent influences like the Beatles, Madonna or Motown greats like Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye. This is because classical music is a big part of the soundtrack of our lives – even if we don’t realize it.

“Classical music is too often seen as the prerogative of the privileged in this country. Prior to becoming CEO of the Arts Council, I was responsible for the Classic FM radio station, where we attracted a wide and wide range of listeners.

He tells the Daily Express: “It proves that there is no limit to the appeal of classical music. This is something the Arts Council also believes passionately. We believe that any music, including classical music, can inspire you, make you happier, broaden your horizons and open up opportunities.



Source link

]]>